Shanghai between Patrimonialisation and Quick Urbanisation – The Case of Tianzifang

 07/03/2013

 7pm-9pm
 Room Segalen, 25/F, Admiralty Centre, Tower 2, 18 Harcourt Road, Hong Kong (Admiralty MTR station, exit A)

Speaker: Florence Padovani (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

Reservation & Contact: Heipo Leung

cefc@cefc.com.hk / tel: 2876 6910

 

Speaker:

Florence Padovani is currently Assistant Professor at the Sorbonne – Paris 1 university where she is in charge of the Chinese Studies program. After her PHD in EHESS – Advanced School for Social Science Studies (Paris)- she received a post-doctorate scholarship to conduct research in Hong Kong. She then taught at CUHK for five years before gaining a research scholarship from the John Hopkins University. Later she taught at the SASS in Shanghai, and The Beijing Center in Beijing before going back to Paris. Over the last fifteen years, she has been doing intensive research and fieldwork in China about forced migration, focusing mainly on the Three Gorges dam resettlees and on the social burden of Shanghai quick development.

Abstract:

Tianzifang is one of the most famous place in Shanghai. It is often regarded by Chinese tourists and foreigners alike as a typical Shanghai area. In fact, Tianzifang has been made up by different actors and its uniqueness lies more in the interaction of these actors than in the place itself. Today it is exemplified by the attempts on the part of the government and of other places try to follow the model. Interestingly enough, being famous is destroying at the same time its uniqueness. We will analyze the characteristics of Tianzifang and its evolution from a common place to a national touristic area. By doing so, we will highlight the social cost.

ALL INTERESTED ARE WELCOME!

This seminar will be held in English.
Sebastian Veg, Director of the CEFC, will chair the session.
Snacks and drinks will be served after the seminar.
Seats are limited. Please confirm your attendance.

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